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high School academics

MCS offers a comprehensive, University of California (UC) approved college preparatory program. We continue to expand our programs and offerings to meet the specific desires and needs of the high school community.

Our array of courses includes 17 Honors classes, including 15 College Board approved Advanced Placement (AP) offerings. 71% of our most recent AP exam takers satisfied collegiate prerequisite work or earned college course credit through their performance. At least part of that success can be attributed to AP classes that boast of low student-teacher ratios with several classes having fewer than 10 students.

Curriculum Details – Click to Expand


OLD TESTAMENT SURVEY

Grades: 9th | Course Length: 1 year

This course is designed to ground freshmen students in the basic structure of the Old Testament books and events. By surveying God’s dealings with mankind (specifically the nation of Israel), students learn of the attributes of God, the history of mankind, and God’s redemptive thread leading up to the first advent of His only begotten Son, Jesus Christ. Students are also equipped with basic inductive Bible study skills, as well as given practical truths and principles to guide them in their teen years. 

NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY

Grades: 10th | Course Length: 1 year

This course is designed to ground sophomore students in the basic structure of the New Testament books and events. By surveying God’s 'New Testament' work through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, as well as the birth and expansion of the Church, students will have a completed framework of who they are in Christ, where we are currently at on God’s timetable and what is to come. 
 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY

Grades: 11th and 12th | Course Length: 1 year

This course is designed to take a deeper look at what we believe and why we believe it. Upon completing a full survey of the Bible in the first two years of high school, students will now go more in depth to find out what the Bible teaches to develop sound doctrine to guide their lives. This class is taught from the Pre-Millenial, Pre-Tribulational, Dispensational viewpoint in accordance with the doctrinal stance of our parent church, Maranatha Chapel. The major sections of Systematic Theology include: Presuppositions, Theology Proper (the study of God and His attributes), Bibliology, Angelogy (including the study of Satan and Demons), Anthropology (the study of man), Hamartiology (the study of sin), Christology, Soteriology (the study of salvation), Pneumatology (the study of the Holy Spirit), Ecclesiology (the study of the Church), and Eschatology (the study of things to come). 
 

APOLOGETICS/WORLDVIEW

Grades: 11th and 12th | Course Length: 1 year

This course is designed to equip students with the logical and biblical capability of analyzing the 'truth claims' of different worldviews and effectively sharing the good news of the Gospel. The first semester is an intense study in Presuppositional Apologetics while the second semester broadens to a survey of various worldviews (i.e. Christianity, Islam, Secular Humanism, Marxist-Lenninism, Postmodernism, Cosmic Humanism) and how each approaches the 10 major disciplines (i.e. Theology, Philosophy, Ethics, Biology, Psychology, Sociology, Law, Politics, Economics, History). 


9TH GRADE ENGLISH

Course Length: 1 Year

Designed for college preparatory students, this course is intended to build higher-order, critical thinking skills through a strong emphasis on writing. The analysis of a broad range of literary genres, both in anthology and full-length novel formats, will serve as support and context for a variety of writing tasks. Students will develop analytical methodology and critical reading, thinking, listening, and writing skills through reading, class discussions, lectures, note taking, research, and the writing process. Students will develop oral and written communication skills with the effective use of vocabulary, grammar, and expression. Additional work with vocabulary building, syntax, grammar, and language mechanics will be for the purpose of creating a solid foundation for clear, effective, and purposeful writing. This course meets the guidelines of the California Department of Education’s Common Core Content Standards for Language Arts Instruction, UC Course Approval, and Maranatha Christian Schools Expected School-wide Learning Results.

9TH GRADE ENGLISH - HONORS

Course Length: 1 Year

Designed for college preparatory students, this course is intended to build higher-order, critical thinking skills through a strong emphasis on writing. The analysis of a broad range of literary genres, both in anthology and full-length novel formats, will serve as support and context for a variety of writing tasks.  Students will develop analytical methodology and critical reading, thinking, listening, and writing skills through reading, class discussions, lectures, note taking, research, and the writing process. Students will develop oral and written communication skills with the effective use of vocabulary, grammar, and expression. Additional work with vocabulary building, syntax, grammar, and language mechanics will be for the purpose of creating a solid foundation for clear, effective, and purposeful writing. Honors-level academic rigor will be achieved through instruction and activities that consistently require students to operate in the higher levels of the cognitive domain. This course meets the guidelines of the California Department of Education’s Common Core Content Standards for Language Arts Instruction, UC Course Approval, and Maranatha Christian Schools Expected School-wide Learning Results. 

10TH GRADE ENGLISH

Course Length: 1 Year

Sophomore English will emphasize fluency in writing, the revision process, public speaking, reading comprehension, grammar, and vocabulary. Students will have opportunities to work collaboratively and to discuss their ideas. The ultimate goal is that students will form identities that will help them to communicate, collaborate, and solve problems in college and career. Hopefully, students will develop a passion for great literature as well. Our reading list includes Beowulf, Lord of the Flies, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar (in the Pearson textbook), and Much Ado About Nothing. Additionally, students will read several excerpts and poems in the Pearson literature textbook. We will use the Pearson Writing Coach textbook for grammar and writing instruction.

10TH GRADE ENGLISH - HONORS

Course Length: 1 Year

Honors sophomore English will emphasize fluency in writing, the revision process, public speaking, reading comprehension, and vocabulary.  Students will have opportunities to work collaboratively and to discuss their ideas. The ultimate goal is for students to form identities that will help them to communicate, collaborate, and solve problems in college and career. Hopefully, students will develop a passion for great literature as well. By enrolling in the honors course instead of regular English, a student will be responsible for writing longer essays and contributing more to class discussions instead of receiving lessons on the meaning of what they read. Moreover, in the honors class, work is assessed at a significantly higher standard. Our reading list includes Beowulf, Lord of the Flies, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar (in the Pearson textbook), and Much Ado About Nothing.  Additionally, students will read several excerpts and poems in the Pearson literature textbook.  We will use the Pearson Writing Coach textbook for grammar and writing instruction.

11TH GRADE AMERICAN LITERATURE

Course Length: 1 Year

Designed for college preparatory students, this course will continue to build higher-order, critical thinking skills through a strong emphasis on writing. The analysis of a broad range of literary genres within the body of American Literature, both in anthology and full-length novel formats, will serve as support and context for a variety of writing tasks. Students will survey and analyze American Literature within the framework of America's shifting social, political, and cultural landscapes (17th-21st centuries). Students will develop analytical methodology and critical reading, thinking, listening, and writing skills through reading, class discussions, lectures, note taking, research, and the writing process. Continuing work with vocabulary building, syntax, grammar, and language mechanics will be for the purpose of reinforcing clear, effective, and purposeful writing. This course meets the guidelines of the California Department of Education’s Common Core Content Standards for Language Arts Instruction, UC Course Approval, and Maranatha Christian Schools Expected School-wide Learning Results.

12TH GRADE BRITISH LITERATURE

Course Length: 1 Year

British Literature will emphasize fluency in writing, the revision process, public speaking, reading comprehension, grammar, and vocabulary. Students will have opportunities to work collaboratively and to discuss their ideas. The ultimate goal is that students will form identities that will help them to communicate, collaborate, and solve problems in college and career. Hopefully, students will develop a passion for great literature as well. For content, the readings will include Macbeth (in the Pearson textbook), Hamlet, and Frankenstein, in addition to several excerpts and poems in the Pearson literature textbook, from Chaucer to contemporary authors. We will use the Pearson Writing Coach textbook for grammar and writing instruction.

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

Course Length: 1 Year

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition is designed to be as rigorous as an introductory college English course. If a student passes the AP Literature exam in May, then he or she might receive college credit, depending on the college’s policies. The course will emphasize fluency in writing, the revision process, public speaking, reading comprehension, and vocabulary. Students will have opportunities to work collaboratively and to discuss their ideas. The ultimate goal is that students will form identities that will help them to communicate, collaborate, and solve problems in college and career. Hopefully, students will develop a passion for great literature as well. Our reading list includes The Selected Works of Cicero, The Republic, The Inferno, Mere Christianity, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, and Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World. Additionally, students will read about contemporary issues through journalism articles. The coursework includes a summer assignment about Creating Innovators.  

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

Course Length: 1 Year

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition is designed to be as rigorous as an introductory college English course. If a student passes the AP Literature exam in May, then he or she might receive college credit, depending on the college’s policies. The course will emphasize fluency in writing, the revision process, public speaking, reading comprehension, and vocabulary. Students will have opportunities to work collaboratively and to discuss their ideas. The ultimate goal is that students will form identities that will help them to communicate, collaborate, and solve problems in college and career. Hopefully, students will develop a passion for great literature as well. Our reading list includes The Canterbury Tales, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, The Scarlet Letter, and A Tale of Two Cities. Additionally, we will read short stories and poetry, with a special focus on the sonnet form. The coursework includes a summer assignment about Hamlet.  


SPANISH 1

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in English

This course introduces the students to basic vocabulary and fundamental sentence structure in the present and preterit tenses using the natural approach. Basic aural and reading comprehension is developed and students hold simple conversations and write short compositions about present and past actions.

SPANISH 2

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in Spanish 1

This course is a continuation of Spanish 1. Using the Natural Approach, this course stresses basic vocabulary and fundamental sentence structure in the past and future indicative tenses and the subjunctive mood. The course develops basic aural and reading comprehension. Students hold simple conversations and write short compositions in the past and future. Students read simple texts and further study Spanish and Latin American culture

SPANISH 3

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in Spanish 2

This course completes a review of the grammar of Spanish 1 and 2 and introduces more complex aspects of Spanish grammar. A study of the culture continues while students build an active vocabulary and continue to develop proficiency in listening, speaking and writing through discussion, written exercises, compositions, and the reading of poems and short stories. Emphasis is placed on written and oral expression, using correct sentence structure. The advanced course offers more challenging conversation and writing skills, and students will be exposed to a variety of literary and cultural readings. Students will make frequent presentations, both oral and written.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisite: A “C” or better in Spanish 3

Advanced Placement Spanish is an intense course conducted in Spanish intended to cover the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced Spanish composition and conversation. Emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication, it encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. The course objectives are to help students comprehend formal and informal spoken Spanish, acquire vocabulary to allow the accurate reading of authentic literature, compose expository passages, and express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. This course will aid the students to prepare for the AP Spanish Language exam.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1

Course Length: 1 Year

This course is an introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), the language used by Deaf people in the U.S. and most of Canada. Students will be introduced to basic ASL vocabulary and grammar, including fingerspelling and numbers, the use of signing space, facial expressions, simple phrases, asking and answering basic questions, topic/comment sentences, time/tense sentences, classifiers, beginning mouth morphemes and ASL glossing techniques. In addition, students will be introduced to Deaf culture to increase their awareness and respect for deaf individuals and ASL.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (ASL) 2

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisite: Grade of 'C' or higher in ASL 1

American Sign Language (ASL) 2 builds upon all concepts learned in ASL 1 and expands vocabulary and grammar skills. Vocabulary focuses on daily routines, family and community life, recreational activities and lays the foundation for every day conversations and basic interpersonal interactions. ASL grammar introduces conditional clauses, rhetorical questions, additional mouth morphemes, and translation of English idiomatic expressions. Students will deepen their understanding of the Deaf community, its history, and cultural norms.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (ASL) 3

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisite: Grade of 'C' or higher in ASL 2

American Sign Language (ASL) 3 reviews and builds upon all concepts learned in previous ASL courses, and introduces intermediate vocabulary and grammar skills. Intermediate ASL grammar includes the use of classifiers, facial grammar, facial expressions, mouth morphemes, conditional and declarative sentences, and translating English idiomatic expressions. Students will begin to learn how to sign more abstract ideas and concepts. Receptive and expressive skills are stressed in order to increase fluency and self-confidence in ASL. The course also focuses on developing strong cultural competency and a deeper understanding of Deaf culture. 

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (ASL) 4

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisite: Grade of 'C' or higher in ASL 3

American Sign Language (ASL) 4 reviews and builds upon all concepts learned in previous ASL courses, and introduces advanced vocabulary and complex grammar skills. Advanced ASL grammar expands a student’s use and understanding of all verb types, prefix translations, pronoun complexities, abbreviations that are unique to ASL, and advanced mouth morphemes, as well as the irregularities and exceptions to ASL grammar rules. Students will further develop conversational competence, translate more substantial formal and informal English texts, interact with Deaf community members, and learn basic consecutive ASL interpreting. In this course, classroom instruction is given primarily in ASL.


ALGEBRA I

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisites: 'C' or better in middle school Algebra Readiness

Algebra I is a logical and systematic extension of generalized arithmetic. Algebra I covers writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations, including systems of two linear equations in two unknowns. The student will also study monomial and polynomial expressions, inequalities, exponents, functions, rational expressions, ratio, and proportion. The average student spends from one-half to one hour on homework daily. This course may be used to meet the UC “C” requirement or the CSU math requirement.

GEOMETRY

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisites 'C' or better in Algebra I 

Geometry teaches deductive reasoning and organized thinking. Students study postulates, definitions, and theorems for use in formal proofs and algebraic problems. Students also study plane geometry, solid geometry, straight edge and compass constructions, and transformations. The average student spends from one-half to one hour on homework daily. This course may be used to meet the UC “C” requirement or the CSU math requirement.

ALGEBRA II

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisites: 'C' or better in Geometry

Algebra II deepens the student’s understanding and knowledge of algebra and functions by exploring advanced topics in algebra. The average student spends from one-half to one hour on homework daily. This course may be used to meet the UC “C” requirement or the CSU math requirement.

COLLEGE ALGEBRA

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisites: 'C' or better in Algebra II

This course is an advanced algebra course designed to prepare students for any introductory level college math course. This course includes the following topics: linear relations and functions, systems of equations, polynomial and rational functions, the nature of graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and their graphs, and basic trigonometric identities. Students will leave this course prepared to take the Entry Level Mathematics exam administered by colleges.

PRECALCULUS

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisites: 'C' or better in Algebra II

Precalculus deepens the student’s understanding and knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, and functional analysis. Students will be introduced to the study of polynomials including synthetic division, graphing theory, limits, and derivatives. The average student spends from one-half to one hour on homework daily. This course may be used to meet the UC “C” requirement or the CSU math requirement.

AP CALCULUS AB

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisites: 'C' or better in Precalculus, Teacher recommendation

This course is equivalent to a typical first semester college Calculus course. Topics covered will include limits, derivatives and their applications, and integrals and their applications. Students will become fluent in the language of Calculus. Students will be able to use multiple forms to represent ideas, make arguments, and interpret results. Students will use calculators and other forms of technology to enhance learning and discover new ideas. Students will be prepared to be successful on the AP Calculus AB/BC exam. The syllabi and summer assignments for AP Calculus are found at the right.

AP CALCULUS BC

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisites: 'C' or better in AP Calculus AB, Teacher recommendation

Advanced Placement Calculus BC continues the students understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. This course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally.  This course applies many mathematical concepts a high school student has gained throughout the study of mathematics. Students will be required to apply mathematical concepts to computation, proofs, and problem-solving. This course includes the topics of parametric equations, vector functions, indeterminate forms of limits, polar curves, advanced integration techniques, infinite series, and Taylor polynomials. The course helps the student explain mathematical writing, problem-solving, and graphing challenges. This course will prepare the student for the AP Calculus test.

AP STATISTICS

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisites: 'C' or better in College Algebra or Precalculus

Advanced Placement Statistics is designed to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Topics introduced include the exploratory analysis of data and numerical techniques to study patterns, methods of valid data collection, probability as the tool for anticipating what distributions of data should look like, and confirming models through statistical inference. This course specifically prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Exam for Statistics. Students who successfully complete the course and examination may receive credit and/or advanced placement for a one-semester college statistics course. This course may be used to meet the UC "C" or "F" requirement. The syllabus and summer assignment for AP Statistics are found at the right.


ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

Course Length: 1 year (2 semesters)

Anatomy and Physiology is a yearlong course for the upper-level student that is presented in a lecture and project/lab based format that requires students to use information acquired from previous courses such as chemistry and biology.  The course will provide the student with a core content knowledge and meaningful understanding of the frameworks of human anatomy and physiology by building upon core biological themes and principles.  They will study the 11 major organ systems of the human body. The themes of levels of organization, dynamic homeostasis, and growth and development are emphasized and explored.  The students will learn and study examples of disruptions to normal body homeostasis and become adept at naming and identifying anatomical features and relating their form to their function.  They will gain an understanding of the physical and biochemical process common to most organisms and specific to humans.  They will become skilled at discerning how various types of cells, tissues, organs, and systems interact with each other

BIOLOGY

Course Length: 1 year (2 semesters) | Prerequisite: Algebra I

This is a general biology course that includes units on ecology, cell life, genetics, biological diversity, “simple” organisms, and the human body. Laboratory investigation comprises a key component.

AP BIOLOGY

Course Length: 1 year (2 semesters) | Pre-requisites : Biology and Chemistry

Advanced Placement Biology is designed to prepare you to take the College Board Advanced Placement Biology exam. The course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course taken by biology majors. The first semester will focus on studying the chemistry of life, cells, cellular energetics, heredity, and molecular genetics. The second semester will focus on the diversity of organisms, the structure and function of plants and animals, and ecology. Class activities will include discussion, problem-solving, and 12 required lab experiments. Extensive practice in essay writing and in understanding and responding to multiple choice questions are an integral part of the class. The syllabus and summer assignment for AP Biology are found at the right.

CHEMISTRY

Course Length: 1 year (2 semesters) | Prerequisites: Geometry (may be taken concurrently) and Biology

This is a general chemistry course that examines the fundamental composition of matter and changes from one form of matter to another. Topics include the properties of matter, atomic and molecular structure, the nature of equilibrium, gases, the organization and use of the periodic table, the principles of chemical bonding, characteristics of solutions, the use of stoichiometry, attributes of acids and bases, nuclear chemistry, and organic compounds. Laboratory investigation comprises a key component.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A

Course Length: 1 year (2 semesters) | Prerequisites: 'C' or better in Algebra II

Advanced Placement Computer Science A is designed to introduce students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem-solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using Java language. This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Computer Science A exam.

AP PHYSICS 1

Course Length: 1 year (2 semesters) | Prerequisites: Algebra II (may be taken concurrently) and Chemistry

This is a college-level course that involves the study of the physical world: energy, matter, and how they are related. Included are units on mechanics, waves and light, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. Laboratory investigation comprises a key component.

AP PHYSICS 2

Course Length: 1 year (2 semesters) | Prerequisite: AP Physics 1

This is a college-level course that is based on the “big ideas” in physics, which encompass core scientific principles, theories and processes that cut across traditional boundaries and provide a board way of thinking about the physical world, such as (1) Objects and systems have properties such as mass and charge. Systems may have internal structure. (2) Fields existing in space can be used to explain interactions. (3) The interactions of an object with other objects can be described by forces. (4) Interactions between systems can result in changes in those systems. (5) Changes that occur as a result of interactions are constrained by conservation laws. (6) Waves can transfer energy and momentum from one location to another without the permanent transfer of mass and serve as a mathematical model for the description of other phenomena. (7) The mathematics of probability can be used to describe the behavior of complex systems and to interpret the behavior of quantum mechanical systems. Laboratory investigation comprises a key component.

 


AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

Course Length: 1 Semester

In this course, students will pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American government. Drawing upon knowledge gained from previous courses such as Geography, U.S. and World History, students will examine the inner workings and structures of government from our founding father’s first attempts to govern the colonies, to comparing current day political and economic systems. Students will read the constitution as a living document that continues to provide structure and guidance to the three branches of our government as well as the day-to-day lives of Americans today. As the culmination of high school Social Studies/History this course provides students with the basic tools to enter society as functional, knowledgeable, involved citizens ready to shape the world in which they live.

AP U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

Course Length: 1 Year

The AP® U.S. Government and Politics course is meant to be the equivalent of an introductory level college course which may lead to college credit depending on the students’ performance on the Advanced Placement examination in May. This yearlong course introduces students to key political ideas and institutions that characterize the political culture of the United States. Study of general concepts used to interpret American politics and analysis of specific case studies are included. Students will examine the constitutional underpinnings of American government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, institutions and policy processes of the national government, as well as civil rights issues.

ECONOMICS

Course Length: 1 Semester

Applying the tools from previously completed courses and other subject areas, students will study fundamental economic concepts and operations of economic systems. Within historic contexts, students will learn the basic economic principles of micro- and macro-economics, international economics, comparative economic systems, measurement, and methods. 

WORLD HISTORY

Course Length: 1 Year

This course of study will take students from the roots of democracy to our modern world. Along the way students will focus on events from the late 18th century to today. Topics covered include the revolutionary period from the late 18th century to the mid-19th century, the Industrial Revolution, European nationalism, the new imperialism, the world wars of the 20th century and the rise of totalitarianism that led to them, the Cold War and its aftermath and the globalization of the world. Beyond content, students will develop their analytical and critical thinking skills, and their ability to express themselves both in writing and orally. 

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY

Course Length: 1 Year

The AP® European History course is meant to be the equivalent of an introductory level college course which may lead to college credit depending on their performance on the Advanced Placement examination in May. The course is a full year survey of European history from approximately 1450 to the present day. While the presentation is organized chronologically, the course will also emphasize several themes crucial to the study of European history. These themes will include political and cultural development, political and diplomatic history, and social and economic transformation. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed. Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents, and historiography. 

U.S. HISTORY

Course Length: 1 Year

This course of study begins with a review of the causes and effects of the American Revolutionary War and the Civil War. Topics explored include the settling of the west, the industrialization and urbanization of America, America’s transformation into a world power, the progressive movement, World War I, the between war years, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and modern America. Beyond content, students will develop their analytical and critical thinking skills, and their ability to express themselves both in writing and orally. 

AP U.S. HISTORY

Course Length: 1 Year

The AP® United States History course is meant to be the equivalent of an introductory level college course which may lead to college credit depending on the students’ performance on the Advanced Placement examination in May. The course is a full year survey of American history from pre-Colombian civilization to the present day. While the presentation is organized chronologically, the course will also emphasize several themes crucial to the study of American history. These themes will include political development, economic transformation, the role of religion in the development of America, slavery and its legacy in the United States, and the development of a unique American national character.


HIGH SCHOOL ART I

Course Length: 1 year

By the end of this course, the students will be exposed to a variety of media, styles and periods of art. They will be able to utilize, respond to and understand the Elements and Principles of Design, as well as the aesthetic value, in their artwork and the work of others. They will also understand how art has, and will continually shape and reflect our world and the various ways in which they can play a vital role. Students will complete a variety of projects, written assignments and critiques throughout the course to fulfill the UC requirements. At the completion of the course, students will have created a portfolio of work that effectively uses the Elements and Principles of Design, expresses personal thoughts and emotions, and demonstrates a refinement of skills in various media. 

HIGH SCHOOL ART 2 – STUDIO ART

Course length: 1 year | Prerequisite: Studio Art (Level 1) or equivalent portfolio

Studio Art (Level 2) is an intermediate fine arts class which builds on the elements and principles of art taught in High School Art 1. This class will focus on an overview of Art History, Art Theory, and will explore a wide variety of drawing and painting techniques and mediums. Students will create a personal portfolio by completing a variety of projects designed to strengthen their skills. They will also be challenged to think through fundamental issues of art through various readings assignments, writing projects, and critiques throughout the course, in order to fulfill UC requirements. This class is a prerequisite for AP Art. 

AP STUDIO ART: 2D-DESIGN

Course Length: 1 year | Prerequisites: Art I or equivalent course (or teacher approval)

This college-level course is designed to help students develop technical skills through the investigation of the elements of art as they apply to the principles. Students are encouraged to become independent thinkers who contribute inventively and critically to their culture through the making of 2D art. In lieu of taking an AP exam, students will create a portfolio of work to submit for College Board evaluation. The score a student receives will determine college credit eligibility. This portfolio will include 24-29 works, which are divided into three categories: Breadth, Quality, and Concentration. For the Breadth section, students will work using a variety of mediums and approaches to show their range of skill. For the Concentration section, students will be advised to choose one topic and one medium to study in depth. They will create an artist statement during their Concentration section, which will describe their discovery and philosophy regarding their chosen topic. For the Quality section students will choose their five best art pieces overall. 

DRAMA

Course length: 1 year | Prerequisite(s): None

Students will experience every aspect of theatre and share their God-given talents through productions and group/ individual presentations.The areas of study are: acting basics – skits, monologues, duet scenes, theatre games, theatre terminology, reading one act plays and musicals; producing and directing a stage production; costuming; set design; theatre make-up; choreography; stage combat; technical theatre; introduction to Shakespeare; and perform a play. This course is a performance- based class with emphasis on participation “Acting means doing!” Theatre is an active art form which energizes you and helps with personal expression, understanding and growth while teaching many life skills. Through rehearsals of scenes and/or productions, students will learn teamwork and respect for the art form.  Meets the UC Visual/Performing Arts requirement.

HS MUSICAL THEATRE (DRAMA 2)

Course length: 1 year | Prerequisite(s): Drama or approval by Mrs. Howard

This course is an alternative to an elective class during normal school hours. This is a one year course where students will be required to attend all rehearsals, set builds and performances for the two school musicals during the school year. Rehearsals are Mondays 6–9pm  Fridays 7– 9pm and Saturdays 9–Noon during each semester, with performances in November and March. Students can choose to participate as actors, dancers, assistant directors, sound or lighting technicians, costumers, stage managing or set designers. This course offers the opportunity for the student to develop their passion in whatever area of musical theatre they desire. Drama 1 should be a pre-requisite but not required if approved by Mrs. Howard. This is a UC approved course. 

HEALTH

Course Length: 1 Semester | Prerequisite(s): None

The purpose of this class is to present the Bible as the foundation for a healthy lifestyle. This class will deal with the integration of the physical, mental, social and spiritual dimensions of life. Topics include: building a healthy foundation; physical activity and nutrition; mental, social and emotional health; and prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. Topics of interest include: promoting Godly relationships; spiritual, social and  physical growth and development; tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs; diseases and disorders; injury prevention; and environmental health.

HS GRAPHIC DESIGN

Course Length: 1 Year | Prerequisite(s): Art Photography, Yearbook, Art or Teacher Permission 
Graphic Design is a year-long visual arts course centered on the principles of design and elements of art. The course includes a variety of hands-on projects focused on the course objectives and based on the state standards in the Visual Arts. The emphasis is creative expression and development of one’s personal style. After learning the basics of good design, students will solve design problems through the utilization of Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign, the software tools of choice for most graphic designers. Students will be able to link graphic design to other art forms and academic disciplines and will understand its applications to careers within contemporary society. Included in this class is an analysis of designers from around the world, with special attention to cultural similarities and differences. They will apply this knowledge to their personal designs in the pursuit of effective, creative design and communication, and development as graphic designers. Class participants will be instructed in the process of how to complete numerous computer based projects, starting from preliminary sketching of ideas, to designing and completing projects by a production deadline. Understanding and application of good design will be developed through analysis of their own work as well as the work of established designers. Students will complete regular critiques as they build a portfolio. Students will participate in the annual MCS Art Show. Winners will advance to the ACSI Art Festival.

HS ART PHOTOGRAPHY

Course Length: 1 Year| Prerequisite(s): None

Art Photography is an entry-level course centered on the principles of photography, which include, DSLR camera operation, photographic expression, and digital imagery. This course includes a variety of hands-on projects designed to teach proper use of camera and photographing techniques. As students learn the elements of art and successful compositional skills, they will apply these skills to their own photographs. Students will learn to use camera manual controls such as, ISO, Aperture, and Shutter Speed and how each setting affects each photo. Students will learn and use Adobe Photoshop as their 'digital darkroom,' and have the opportunity to manipulate images in creating photographic art. Students will also explore how photography is used in fashion, advertising, and graphic layout by photographing products, and creating advertisements. During the second semester, students will create an online portfolio, which will feature their class projects. All students will present their photos and participate in the annual MCS Art Show.

AP STUDIO ART: PHOTOGRAPHY

Course Length: 1 Year | Prerequisite(s): Art Photography, Video Production, or approval from teacher

AP Photography is an advanced level studio art course in 2-D design where students will learn new techniques and increase their knowledge and skill in the art of photography. The emphasis in this course will be to continue each student’s creative expression and development with their own personal style as artistic photographers and communicators, and should demonstrate mastery through photography using Adobe Photoshop as their 'digital darkroom.'  Students will study the various properties of photographic art, as well as examine the history and development of photography and complete regular critiques as they build their portfolios. Each student will be required to advance their technical skills in visual elements and submit a well-rounded portfolio to the AP College Board consisting of a breadth, concentration and quality section at the end of the second semester.  In addition, all students will present their photos and participate in the annual MCS Art Show.

ATHLETIC PE

Course length: 1 year

This course is designed to provide Maranatha students the opportunity to develop their strength, speed, and agility while participating in school sports during the regular season as well as in the off-season. The purpose of this class is to increase the athletic ability of each student while raising the competitiveness of Maranatha’s Athletic Program. Each student will participate in sport-specific training taught by Maranatha coaches while the course instructors will provide strength, speed, and agility workouts. More importantly, the Athletic PE class is an avenue for Maranatha’s student-athletes to get the most out of their God-given gifts while building unity, team pride, and fostering school spirit and camaraderie with their fellow students.

VIDEO PRODUCTION

Course length: 1 Year | Prerequisite(s): None

In this class students will study filmmaking and create a wide variety of video-based projects such as bumpers, movie trailers, music videos, commercials, documentaries, and short films. Students will step through pre-production, production, and post-production processes. Also, students will learn proper cinematography techniques, lighting, and sound capture using different types of microphones. They will learn about the many job roles within the film industry (editing, screenwriting, sound design, lighting, acting, directing, and production), the basics of filming with DSLRs, editing videos using Adobe Premiere CS6, and how to utilize film to market a business. By taking this class, students will have unique opportunities to produce videos that may be used for chapel, social media, and even the school’s website.  At the completion of this course every student will not only have a solid foundation of knowledge and experience, but a video portfolio to market their own work. All students will present their productions and participate in the annual MCS Art Show.

CONTEMPORARY MUSIC

Course Length: 1 year (2 semesters)

The goals of this class are to develop and engage the music student through smaller contemporary music ensembles. Students will learn how to become confident, knowledgeable, and musical decision makers. The course will present a strong emphasis on live performance, improvising, song writing, composing, arranging, editing and a hands-on approach in the recording arts. Students will learn applicable music theory that accompanies being a successful member of a smaller music ensemble. The course will also present the history and significance of music found in our contemporary music world. Meets the UC Visual/Performing Arts requirement.

 


textbooks

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iPAD PROGRAM

Our iPad program is a one-to-one computing program where each student in the High School has an iPad. One-to-one computer models have been shown to increase learning by greater engagement by the students. Most of our High School textbooks are available on iPad. 

iPad FAQs


Yes, all students in the High School must have a full sized iPad. Students must have an iPad2 or newer. The original iPad (without a camera) and iPad minis are not acceptable.

 

No. The digital curriculum and other subject specific apps are only available on the iPad.


Bring your iPad to school every day.


Yes. You must always have your iPad in a case while at school.


Yes, you can use peripheral devices, such as keyboards, with your iPad.

We do not have any printers on our school campus that will allow you to print from your iPad. If you don't have a printer at home which will interface with the iPad, the best procedure is to email the document to yourself and print from your home computer.

Not necessarily. The iPad has a finite number of charges: this means it can only be recharged so many times before the battery no longer works properly. Therefore, you should only charge your iPad when it gets low, for example, around 5%. “Topping off” the battery charge every night will only shorten the lifetime of the battery. However, you must have enough charge to use your iPad in all classes every day.

No, but passcodes are recommended, to protect your data from others. However, if you forget your passcode, the only way to recover is to wipe the iPad clean and start again. In that instance, you would lose anything that is not saved elsewhere.

The school has a global internet content filter but as with all filters, they can't block everything. Off campus, your student's iPad will be completely unfiltered.

Every student will be required to have their name on the lock screen of their iPad. This is easily done in any photo editor, including Paint on your home computer or any photo editing app on the iPad. Student iPads will also be required to set the name of their iPad as their first and last name.